May 16, 2012
#reggae #jamaica #advertising #travel #music - This is the engineer that works at the Marley Tuff Gong Studio, Greg “Cuppy-G” -  He’s a really really nice guy and if you need any engineering done, this is the guy to do it.  Tuff Gong is the biggest most modern studio Ive seen in JA.  HUGE!  Very historic as well.   - By Sam Diephuis

#reggae #jamaica #advertising #travel #music - This is the engineer that works at the Marley Tuff Gong Studio, Greg “Cuppy-G” -  He’s a really really nice guy and if you need any engineering done, this is the guy to do it.  Tuff Gong is the biggest most modern studio Ive seen in JA.  HUGE!  Very historic as well.   - By Sam Diephuis

May 14, 2012
#reggae #music #jamaica #music #advertising - Cockburn Pen - Sam Diephuis

#reggae #music #jamaica #music #advertising - Cockburn Pen - Sam Diephuis

May 1, 2012
Me at Weddy Weddy Wednesday. 

Me at Weddy Weddy Wednesday. 

April 28, 2012
August Town sound system - Kingston Jamaica - By Sam Diephuis

August Town sound system - Kingston Jamaica - By Sam Diephuis

March 26, 2012

Warning! don’t listen to this if you want some relaxing reggae music or if you around a sleeping baby or in a crowded quiet office space.  This is an acapella version of a dancehall song by Sizzla.  I want to post this to give you an idea of what these artists can do with their voice.  Not far off from the punk rock of the early 80’s actually.  Think Henry Rollins (Black Flag) or Ian McKay (Minor Threat).  The music is made in a very similar way to old punk rock as well.  Small studios, no budget, WAY too controversial for the big labels.   Feel free to turn it off once you’ve gotten the gist it’s not for everyone. 


Cyaan Too Much (Acapella) by Sizzla Kalonji

March 26, 2012
Dance party attendees. By Sam Diephuis

Dance party attendees. By Sam Diephuis

March 25, 2012
Trench Town Speaker Sound System…
These speakers were at full volume and there was 3 sets of them all as high as the one you see here facing a center area for dancing.  We were only there for the warm up.  Unbelievably loud.  So loud in fact that I would not have had my kid near them with out ear protection.  Hearing reggae through these was like no other musical experience I have had. 
Keep in mind all the buildings you see in the background and on the side are Trench Town residents houses.  If you don’t like it, tough luck.  Wanna sleep?  Sorry not tonight. 
By Sam Diephuis

Trench Town Speaker Sound System…

These speakers were at full volume and there was 3 sets of them all as high as the one you see here facing a center area for dancing.  We were only there for the warm up.  Unbelievably loud.  So loud in fact that I would not have had my kid near them with out ear protection.  Hearing reggae through these was like no other musical experience I have had. 

Keep in mind all the buildings you see in the background and on the side are Trench Town residents houses.  If you don’t like it, tough luck.  Wanna sleep?  Sorry not tonight. 

By Sam Diephuis

December 18, 2011

 
“Once-fertile but often-forgotten ground in the birth of the sound that has rocked skinheads in England and freedom fighters in apartheid era South Africa, from sound systems in Europe and from transistor radios all over the world.- Mel Cooke 
From the 60s-90s Orange Street in Downtown Kingston was once the largest hub of most reggae recording and distribution on the planet.  This street was the center for most of the hit makers of the golden era of reggae music. Unfortunately because of “progress” and technology the days of records and recording has been replaced with pirated CDs and home studios, which is making these music business’ slowly become a thing of the past.  Thankfully the interest in reggae records in Europe and Japan is still alive which helps these stores continue to keep their doors open.
I’m not a historian, a writer, or Jamaican and if you want to know more about reggae check out this link to watch a documentary about the history of reggae music.
Here’s a few pictures of the owners of the record stores.  
Sam Diephuis

 

“Once-fertile but often-forgotten ground in the birth of the sound that has rocked skinheads in England and freedom fighters in apartheid era South Africa, from sound systems in Europe and from transistor radios all over the world.- Mel Cooke 

From the 60s-90s Orange Street in Downtown Kingston was once the largest hub of most reggae recording and distribution on the planet.  This street was the center for most of the hit makers of the golden era of reggae music. Unfortunately because of “progress” and technology the days of records and recording has been replaced with pirated CDs and home studios, which is making these music business’ slowly become a thing of the past.  Thankfully the interest in reggae records in Europe and Japan is still alive which helps these stores continue to keep their doors open.

I’m not a historian, a writer, or Jamaican and if you want to know more about reggae check out this link to watch a documentary about the history of reggae music.

Here’s a few pictures of the owners of the record stores.  

Sam Diephuis

December 3, 2011
Back of a taxi and a local Kingston Jamaica.  Sam Diephuis

Back of a taxi and a local Kingston Jamaica.  Sam Diephuis

November 30, 2011
I went on a long hike today.  Like 4 hours long hike.  Way way up into the mountains behind Kingston.  The roads ended and the trail began.  Hundreds of people live in these mountains and use only their legs for transportation.  Amazing that they can do this walk everyday.  Here’s some of the images from the hike… AND yes, they have music even on the mountain side.  LOUD dancehall ususally. 
… You can’t escape music in Jamaica.  Not even on hike in the mountains.
Sam Diephuis

I went on a long hike today.  Like 4 hours long hike.  Way way up into the mountains behind Kingston.  The roads ended and the trail began.  Hundreds of people live in these mountains and use only their legs for transportation.  Amazing that they can do this walk everyday.  Here’s some of the images from the hike… AND yes, they have music even on the mountain side.  LOUD dancehall ususally. 

… You can’t escape music in Jamaica.  Not even on hike in the mountains.

Sam Diephuis

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »