June 19, 2012

Stranger Cole

(Source: bronaghlolateague / Mohair Slim)

April 15, 2012
#music #advertising #reggae #photography Scabba, Techniques Records, Kingston JA
By Sam Diephuis

#music #advertising #reggae #photography Scabba, Techniques Records, Kingston JA

By Sam Diephuis

March 26, 2012
DJ- 2:47 am, Sunday night.  Not to be confused with Saturday night which would make some since being up at 2:47am.  by Sam Diephuis

DJ- 2:47 am, Sunday night.  Not to be confused with Saturday night which would make some since being up at 2:47am.  by Sam Diephuis

January 4, 2012
I wonder what it says?  Got a write up in a Turkish magazine of Evern Goknar.  He won a Grammy for some recordings and mixing he did of Native Americans in New Mexico.  Cool stuff and congratulations!  Photography by Sam Diephuis

I wonder what it says?  Got a write up in a Turkish magazine of Evern Goknar.  He won a Grammy for some recordings and mixing he did of Native Americans in New Mexico.  Cool stuff and congratulations!  Photography by Sam Diephuis

December 18, 2011
"Once-fertile but often-forgotten ground in the birth of the sound that has rocked skinheads in England and freedom fighters in apartheid era South Africa, from sound systems in Europe and from transistor radios all over the world.- Mel Cooke 
From the 60s-90s Orange Street in Downtown Kingston was once the largest hub of most reggae recording and distribution on the planet.  This street was the center for most of the hit makers of the golden era of reggae music. Unfortunately because of “progress” and technology the days of records and recording has been replaced with pirated CDs and home studios, which is making these music business’ slowly become a thing of the past.  Thankfully the interest in reggae records in Europe and Japan is still alive which helps these stores continue to keep their doors open.
I’m not a historian, a writer, or Jamaican and if you want to know more about reggae check out this link to watch a documentary about the history of reggae music.
Here’s a few pictures of the owners of the record stores.  
Sam Diephuis

"Once-fertile but often-forgotten ground in the birth of the sound that has rocked skinheads in England and freedom fighters in apartheid era South Africa, from sound systems in Europe and from transistor radios all over the world.- Mel Cooke 

From the 60s-90s Orange Street in Downtown Kingston was once the largest hub of most reggae recording and distribution on the planet.  This street was the center for most of the hit makers of the golden era of reggae music. Unfortunately because of “progress” and technology the days of records and recording has been replaced with pirated CDs and home studios, which is making these music business’ slowly become a thing of the past.  Thankfully the interest in reggae records in Europe and Japan is still alive which helps these stores continue to keep their doors open.

I’m not a historian, a writer, or Jamaican and if you want to know more about reggae check out this link to watch a documentary about the history of reggae music.

Here’s a few pictures of the owners of the record stores.  

April 19, 2011

This is from a series I’ve been doing in music studios in LA. It’s been a really fun project and I’ve met some really great people.  I like shooting in the smaller studios because they are more open to letting me shoot what I want, when I want.  They also don’t keep them as clean which I like because there is more creativity sitting around.  

Photos by Sam Diephuis

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